Tag Archives: code geass

Cool Escapes

'So, as we pray, Unlimited Grace Works!'

Unlimited Grace Works

CCY’s first ‘Twelve Days Project’ (which sounds like a doomsday device, if you ask me) was more or less the first thing that happened on this blog, so I’d be foolish not to repeat the exercise for 2008. Why so late starting, though?

Two reasons: firstly, as you may or may not have noticed I’ve been away meditating in a cave behind a waterfall recently, and secondly I bothered to do some research wiki’d, and the apparently the traditional Twelve Days run from Christmas Day to Epiphany. Far be it from me to go against tradition. Continue reading

Meet It Is I Set It Down

codegeass-magazine

Nina’s use of a table to express her passion for Euphemia in the twelfth episode of Code Geass remains one of the most startling moments in a show which, whatever else you think of it, certainly has its fair share of startlement. It’s a very brief scene, which incongruously interrupts the Black Knights’ discussion of a possible meeting with some high-level backers (or, in other words, Important Plot Business).

Continue reading

Not Elevens, Allusions

Pretty Sparkles

The funny thing is, wildarmsheero is right: Code Geass doesn’t have a pretentious bone in its body. It’s the fans who are the pretentious ones. The show is just noise and pictures, and it’s the fans who shove the meaning on it. We’ve been here before, and we don’t need to say anything about Code Geass at all – it can just be enjoyed. Nevertheless, some of us find it even more enjoyable if we do say things about it, so, while we don’t need to talk about Kallen, I want to. It’s viewer’s prerogative time.

Continue reading

Sounding Foreign in My Mouth

Magic Bullets

Mahou Shoujo Lyrical Nanoha A’s features a group of magical antagonists whose combat terminology is in German, although this is by no means the only foreign language used in the series (Bardiche and Raging Heart are noted for their English, while ‘Asura’ is a Sanskrit term and so forth). Quite what the status and connotations of the German language are in Japan I’ve no idea (though I’d like to find out) so I can’t guess what the intention of the staff behind Nanoha‘s German is.

Continue reading

Colonial Code Geass and Narnian Nerve Gas

Beautocks
‘Pizza Butt’ is an inelegant nickname. I propose ‘Beauttocks’ as an alternative.

You may recall that in the first episode of the first season of Code Geass, one of the resistance fighters, having been wounded, reaches out towards a button next to a picture of his family, mutters ‘Nippon banzai!’ and blows up the truck he’s driving. Now I am not Japanese, and in fact I have my doubts about the act of suicide, but I nevertheless found this moment rather stirring. The scene as a whole, however, is also rather disturbing – and not, I hasten to add, because of any patriotic fervour or jingoism, but for a rather subtler reason. This, remember, is the context: the resistance have got their hands on a container of what they think is a gas weapon from the Britannian military, and the lorry carrying it it is trying to escape through Tokyo’s old subway system.

Continue reading

Lelouch’s Little Light Reading

Nothing like a good book

Eagle-eyed viewers of Code Geass R2‘s first episode may have spotted that Lelouch is reading Dante’s Divina Commedia while Rollo gives him a lift. (As a child, I never loved anyone enough to give them my last Rolo.)

Continue reading

Lelouch Lamperouge, Siscon Machiavelli

The Eyes

This entry, like many others, began as one of ‘those’ comments on someone else’s blog; you know the type, a comment which makes you run Notepad so you can save drafts and print proofreading copies, a comment which stretches down the narrow comment field like the ever-rolling stream of time itself. The blog in question was iniksbane’s. His remarks on Kaiji and Lelouch prompted me to once again enter the field wearing Code Geass‘s token.

Kaiji and Lelouch both seem to defy categorisation – almost always a good thing, when it comes to characters – and I hadn’t considered comparing them. I think iniksbane neatly nails down Kaiji’s character: Kaiji has a clearer vision of the choices he’s faced with than the other debtors, hence his realisation that pushing someone off his girder and then apologising is stupid, but he’s incapable of being the cold bastard that he’d like to be (and perhaps that the yakuza would like him to become too). In fact (extemporising here) part of Kaiji‘s appeal is that Kaiji sometimes manages to fight his oppressors’ dehumanising systems by becoming more rather than less heroic in his behaviour.

Normally I try to restrain myself from looking too closely at characters, but I’m not so sure I agree with iniksbane about Lelouch. I’ve struggled to describe Lelouch in the past, but I’ll take another wild stab at my own understanding of him here (spoilers ahead, of course). Continue reading